Posted by: energywriter | April 18, 2016

Choices

Thoughts to Ponder

April 18, 2016

 “A major advantage of age is learning to accept people without passing judgment.”

Liz Carpenter*

Most of us have learned to judge people by their age, size, color, wealth, education and many other non-specific criteria that we have stashed away in our minds. Often we judge those who don’t meet our standards harshly. Other times we can dismiss those differences with a “different strokes for different folks” attitude. Being able to accept other people for who they are is an attitude most of us cultivate.

Today, however, I want to discuss a must more difficult challenge – accepting ourselves where we are each and every moment. Most of us have learned to accept ourselves most of the time. Periodically, we still denigrate ourselves with “shoulda, woulda, coulda”. To some extent, that is just human nature. We have a choice. We can live with and nurture our petty complaints or we can look at the big picture. We’re alive. We’re functioning to whatever ability we have and are able to feel empathy for others.

This last was a choice I denied myself yesterday. I woke up feeling deprived, abused, neglected and generally in a sorry mood. I was upset because over the past few years I’ve had some health issues, annoying and inconvenient, but in the larger view, rather petty. I ranted at my God, angels, guides, and whomever else might have been listening. “I’m tired of all these health issues! If I had the energy I could have done this activity. If I hadn’t had to spend so much money on medications, physical therapy and dental work I could have gone on this trip or done that project. I’m angry. I want to spend my time and energy on having fun, not on health issues.” The worst part was that I shared my anger with a kind, young man whose mother can’t eat solid food. I’m sure she wishes that her health issues were as minor as mine.

This morning I awoke with a lesson that I’ve shared here in the past, but had been floating around in my miasma of anger and fear. Yes, fear. If I’m this decrepit now, what will life be like in another 10 years? The truth is I probably have another 10 years or 20 or more to learn what life holds for me.

The most important lesson is that we cannot change who and what we are until we accept who and what we are today, in this very moment. I had to accept that I was angry over relatively easily handled problems. The doctor sent me to physical therapy to relieve what has turned out to be temporary pain. If I didn’t spend money on therapy I may have eventually lost the use of my arm. What would have that cost? My recent bout with breathing issues is healing with prescription medications. What would have been the cost without that option? Expensive dental work provided me with a new tooth. What would have been the long-term cost of not being able to eat crunchy food?

Each of us faces his/her own personal issues to complain about and accept or not accept. We all have our personal heroes who have borne difficulties that we can only imagine, yet triumphed in life. Helen Keller and Steven Hawking are two who come immediately to mind. Keller was deaf and blind, yet blossomed into a woman we often quote for inspiration. Hawking cannot control his body, yet his brain continues to astound us on a regular basis. They continue to inspire us to move forward, no matter what. As long as life is, we have hope.

Spirit,

Thank you for putting our problems in perspective. Thank you for showing us that acceptance and gratitude are the basis for a happy life. Thank you for giving us the ability to see the positive outcomes of our negative experiences. Thank you for giving us another day to live in gratitude.

And, so it is.

*Carpenter, Liz, The Treasury of Women’s Quotations, pg. 20, Carolyn Warner, Prentiss Hall, 1992

Sharon D. Dillon, energywriter@cox.net, http://energywriter.me

Chesapeake Bay Writers, Erma Bombeck Writers Workshop, Southern Humorists, National Society of Newspaper Columnists

Author of one of 14 stories in The Book of Mom: Reflections of Motherhood with Love, Hope and Faith, published by booksyoucantrust.com. Available in print and e-format at Amazon.com

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Responses

  1. Nice observation.

    • Thank you, Dave. Sometimes we have to bang our heads against the wall before the light comes on.

  2. Wonderful blog! I recently went through a bout of cancer and then followed by auto immune disease diagnosis. I have three kids and found myself experiencing the exact same feelings you described. Thank you for the perspective. You are a wonderful writer!

    • Thank you, Jamee. I’m glad you were able to relate. I send good thoughts for continued healing and joy with your children.

  3. Another of those “What we focus on persists” theories… a wonderful woman named Louise Hay, taught me to say “Thank You for Coming” to whatever shows up wanted or unwanted… Thank the aches and pains for stopping by and tell them goodbye….Because you have to many other adventures to plan and take and they are not welcome to come with you! No room in the Luggage! 🙂 Great story my friend!

    • Thank you, Brenda. You are so right. Louise Hay has been a great teacher to so many of us. This is one of those issues I have to face every so often. I go along great, then hit a bump and fall back into the pit for a few days or weeks, then I climb out again.
      Hope all is well with you.

  4. Another poignant article, Sharon. The potter must understand the clay before crafting a vessel.

    • True. And we have to keep re-kneading the clay.

  5. Did you see the news about the girl who lost a leg in the Boston Marathon bombing, but ran in the marathon this year? Wow, talk about carrying on in spite of adversity. In view of that, what do we really have to complain about?

    • I did and was amazed at her bravery and determination. I mope around about parts that don’t work as they should, but she lost a valuable body part. What do I have to whine about?

  6. Nicely done! Right to the point and written with energy.

    • Thank you, Linda. Sometimes things have to smack us in the face before we recognize them.

  7. This is a beautiful piece Sharon! One of those life lessons I know I have to keep reminding myself of over and over.

    • Thank you, Dorothy. You are so right. I tackle this topic at least once a year.


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